Why My Feminism Includes Traditional Gender Roles, and Yours Should, Too

Why My Feminism Includes Traditional Gender Roles, and Yours Should, Too

When you hear the word 'feminist', you might think of a modern, progressive, gender-fluid riot grrrl wearing a Cats Against Catcalls t-shirt. You might picture Gloria Steinem or any number of other famous feminists and what they fought for. Maybe you even imagine the original suffragettes getting thrown in jail for fighting for our right to vote back when the world was much more black-and-white. Who you likely don't imagine when picturing what a feminist looks like is me: a stay-at-home housewife.

It's Time You Learned The Truth About Intersectional Feminism

It's Time You Learned The Truth About Intersectional Feminism

"There should be no ideal woman, all women are beautiful – skinny legs, fat ass, big and little bellies, pimples, flabby skin, bald, big ears, small and big lips, stretch marks, sunken eyes, dark skin, pale skin, short, tall, wide and narrow – every bit of every woman deserves to be represented, not just one type." Intersectionality is explored in-depth in this article. It's a concept that's vital to the health of the feminist and body positive movements, and something we all have a social responsibility to be actively participating in. Thanks so much for this powerful read, Grace! 

How To Be Inclusive of Those With Disabilities

How To Be Inclusive of Those With Disabilities

Within the Feminist and Body Positive Movements, those with disabilities are often marginalized and left feeling alienated or even ostracized.

Even though this marginalization is largely unintended, it can still hurt. As someone with both a rare bone disease and autism, I know first-hand how much being underrepresented and overlooked can affect someone's self-image and feeling of personal value. Here are a few easy tips on how to be more inclusive of those with all kinds of disabilities: